Ushuaia: Photos From the End of the World

On the Tierra del Fuego archipelago, at the southern tip of South America, sits the Argentinian city of Ushuaia, known as the southernmost city in the world, or sometimes, “the end of the world.” A couple of months ago, Getty Images photographer Mario Tama spent a short time in Ushuaia, capturing images of the harbor, the city, the people, the mountains, and nearby glaciers. He found that residents are facing several challenges, including the possible loss of their main drinking water supply as the Martial Glacier retreats. Tama: “Ushuaia and surrounding Tierra del Fuego face other environmental challenges including a population boom leading to housing challenges following an incentivization program attracting workers from around Argentina. Population in the region increased 11-fold between 1970 and 2015 to around 150,000. An influx of cruise ship tourists and crew, many on their way to Antarctica, has also led to increased waste and pollution in the area.”

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