A Trip to the Dead Sea

The Dead Sea, on the border between Israel and Jordan, is the lowest and saltiest body of water in the world—and experts say it is on course to dry out by 2050, now shrinking by one meter per year. A water shortage in the already-dry region has been compounded by a growing population, agricultural uses, tourism, and industry that are diverts almost 90 percent of the Jordan River that normally flowed into the Dead Sea. The lowering water table has also caused thousands of sinkholes to form, some swallowing up roads and tourist resorts. A massive project is now moving forward to alleviate the loss of water, called the Red Sea–Dead Sea Water Conveyance: a $10 billion, 100-mile-long water pipeline in Jordan, built to pump water from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea. The pipeline, much delayed, is now slated to begin construction in 2018.

Read more
Hints: View this page full screen. Skip to the next and previous photo by typing j/k or ←/→.

Most Recent

  • Hannah Mckay / Reuters

    Photos of the Week: Newborns, Chocolate Hills, Teacher of the Year

    A baby visits the U.S. Senate floor, Boston Marathoners end up miserably wet, orca whales hunt seal pups in Argentina, Israel celebrates its Independence Day, and much more.

  • ESA / Copernicus Sentinel Data

    The Megafire Burning in Oklahoma

    In western Oklahoma, a region suffering through a harsh drought, several wildfires have recently broken out, including the Rhea Fire, a “megafire” which has burned more than 260,000 acres.

  • Larry Busacca / Getty for Coachella

    Scenes From Coachella 2018

    Last weekend, the first part of the 2018 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival took place in Indio, California, headlined by Beyoncé.

  • Eric Lafforgue / Art in All of Us / Corbis via Getty

    Travel Monday: A Photo Trip to Ethiopia's Danakil Depression

    In the Afar region of northern Ethiopia, lies a vast, tortured, desert plain called the Danakil Depression.