A Trip to the Dead Sea

The Dead Sea, on the border between Israel and Jordan, is the lowest and saltiest body of water in the world—and experts say it is on course to dry out by 2050, now shrinking by one meter per year. A water shortage in the already-dry region has been compounded by a growing population, agricultural uses, tourism, and industry that are diverts almost 90 percent of the Jordan River that normally flowed into the Dead Sea. The lowering water table has also caused thousands of sinkholes to form, some swallowing up roads and tourist resorts. A massive project is now moving forward to alleviate the loss of water, called the Red Sea–Dead Sea Water Conveyance: a $10 billion, 100-mile-long water pipeline in Jordan, built to pump water from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea. The pipeline, much delayed, is now slated to begin construction in 2018.

Read more
Hints: View this page full screen. Skip to the next and previous photo by typing j/k or ←/→.

Most Recent

  • Siphiwe Sibeko / Reuters

    Photos of the Week: Grenadier Guards, Floating Island, Wrapped Arch

    Flooding in southern France, cliff diving in Ireland, civilian astronauts’ launch from Florida, an elephant bath in Pakistan, scenes from the Met Gala in New York City, and much more

  • Hannibal Hanschke / Reuters

    Scenes From Greenland

    Snapshots from the largest island in the world

  • Dr. Andrew Mark Posselt, California

    Photographing the Microscopic: Winners of Nikon Small World 2021

    Some of the winning and honored images from the 2021 Small World Photomicrography Competition

  • Zhe Ji / Getty

    Photos of the Week: Depleted Lake, Wayward Cow, Alligator Reef

    A “Tribute in Light” in New York City, lingering power outages in Louisiana, rice harvesting in Japan, final scenes from the Tokyo 2020 Paralympics, a Neanderthal in the Netherlands, and much more