Mourning the Victims of the Quebec Mosque Attack

On January 29, 2017, six people were killed and eight more injured after a gunman opened fire at the Islamic Cultural Centre in Quebec City, as members were gathering for Sunday evening prayers. The alleged attacker, a 27-year-old student from Quebec with reportedly extreme right-wing and anti-immigrant views, was captured and has been charged with six counts of first-degree murder and five counts of attempted murder. Over the weekend, members of Quebec’s Muslim community were joined by government officials, members of neighboring synagogues and churches, and thousands of other Canadian citizens as they mourned the dead, comforted the families and survivors, created memorials in the streets, and came together in public demonstrations of unity.

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