All Is Water: The Global Crisis in Photographs

Mustafah Abdulaziz has spent the last five years examining humanity's relationship to one of the most basic and precious natural resources: water. Traveling to nine countries, Abdulaziz photographed the polluted rivers of Brazil, the fisheries of China, and the elaborate sewers of New York City for his essay “Water Stories.” His work was supported in part with funding from Earthwatch, WaterAid, WWF, and HSBC's Water Programme.

While ostensibly organized around the oceans, wells, and wetlands of the world, the images touch upon many complicated topics, including mineral extraction, energy, natural disaster, population growth, and climate change. “There, amidst nearly every major challenge facing our planet, was water itself, the subject and the stage,” Abdulaziz said. “It was a resource whose existence reaches back to our origins and whose health will determine our future.” Sixty-eight of his images from are currently on display in New York City on the East River waterfront until October 12.  

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