Human Impact on the Earth: Lake Powell

Lake Powell is a reservoir on the border of Utah and Arizona, formed from the Colorado River by the Glen Canyon Dam. Severe drought conditions and unsustainable withdrawals have lowered the levels of Lake Powell to about 42 percent of its capacity. The reservoir provides water for millions of people across several western states. The U.S. Department of the Interior forecasts similar levels for next year, with an unpredictable impact from snowpack accumulation, which was very low this year. Ahead of the United Nations Climate Conference in Paris this December, Reuters will be releasing a series of stories, called "Earthprints," focusing on the ability of humans to impact the landscape of the planet. Today's story on Lake Powell is the first in a weekly series, which will continue until December.

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