'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red'

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I in 1914. On this year's Armistice Day in London, a massive work of art dedicated to commonwealth servicemen and women lost a century ago reached its conclusion. The evolving installation, titled "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red", began back on July 17, with the placing of a single ceramic poppy in the moat of the Tower of London. In the months since, another 888,245 poppies were added, each representing a military fatality from World War I. The poppies were arranged to appear as a flowing sea of blood pouring from the Tower's "Weeping Window". More than four million visitors have already viewed the installation, which will start to come down soon.

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