Grand Central Terminal Turns 100

A century ago, rail travel was at its peak in the U.S., and New York City built the massive Grand Central Terminal to accommodate the growth. Built over 10 years, gradually replacing its predecessor named Grand Central Station, the Grand Central Terminal building officially opened on February 2, 1913. The terminal and the surrounding neighborhood thrived -- by 1947, 65 million people a year were traveling through the building. However, in the latter half of the 20th century, rail travel declined sharply, and Grand Central Terminal fell into disrepair, threatened several times with demolition. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority was able to undertake a huge restoration in the 1990s, and Grand Central remains a New York City icon today, 100 years after it first opened.

Read more
Hints: View this page full screen. Skip to the next and previous photo by typing j/k or ←/→.

Most Recent

  • Francesco Prandoni / Getty

    Photos of the Week: Aerial Straps, Gliding Club, Durdle Door

    Recovering from COVID-19 in Mexico City, a midday cannon in St. Petersburg, protests in Minneapolis, tennis training in France, giraffes in Nairobi, sunrise at the Grand Canyon, and much more.

  • Al Bello / Getty

    Socializing in a Pandemic, Protected by Plastic

    Schools, restaurants, workplaces, and shops have installed plexiglass shields and plastic curtains, tents, and screens as measures to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, leading to a new social landscape of clear-plastic barriers.

  • CSNafzger / Shutterstock

    Idaho: Images of the Gem State

    A few glimpses of Idaho’s landscape, and some of the animals and people calling it home

  • Brynn Anderson / AP

    Photos of the Week: Sydney Fog, House Hat, Crow Pursuit

    Skiing in the French Alps, flooding in Michigan, a drive-through burlesque in Las Vegas, disinfecting streets in Buenos Aires, social-distancing rings in Turkey, a fawn rescue in Germany, and much more