Grand Central Terminal Turns 100

A century ago, rail travel was at its peak in the U.S., and New York City built the massive Grand Central Terminal to accommodate the growth. Built over 10 years, gradually replacing its predecessor named Grand Central Station, the Grand Central Terminal building officially opened on February 2, 1913. The terminal and the surrounding neighborhood thrived -- by 1947, 65 million people a year were traveling through the building. However, in the latter half of the 20th century, rail travel declined sharply, and Grand Central Terminal fell into disrepair, threatened several times with demolition. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority was able to undertake a huge restoration in the 1990s, and Grand Central remains a New York City icon today, 100 years after it first opened.

Read more
Hints: View this page full screen. Skip to the next and previous photo by typing j/k or ←/→.

Most Recent

  • Steffen Olsen / Danish Meteorological Institute via Reuters

    Photos of the Week: Kangaroo Boxing, Royal Ascot, Moon Pool

    A hungry polar bear in Russia, Women's World Cup action in France, exuberant Raptors fans in Toronto, a “Protest Against Divisiveness” in New York, aquabike racing in Hungary, and much more.

  • USGS

    Apollo Training: When Arizona Stood In for the Moon

    Arizona’s existing geology, coupled with man-made crater fields, hosted numerous moonlike sites for Apollo astronauts to train.

  • Chan Srithaweeporn / Getty

    Photos: The Moods of Monument Valley

    A collection of images of some of the many moods of this iconic valley, from wild storms to dusky evenings to bright, sunlit panoramas

  • Vincent Yu / AP

    Photos: Hong Kong Protesters Return to the Streets

    Hundreds of thousands of Hong Kong citizens filled the city’s streets for a second weekend of protest against a controversial extradition bill.