Ivory Coast's Leader Under Siege

Following a presidential election last November, Ivory Coast's incumbent leader, Laurent Gbagbo, refused to step down despite his apparent loss at the polls. Challenger Alassane Outtara was declared the winner and recognized as such internationally. Since then supporters loyal to both figures have been involved in sporadic, often violent, clashes. Backed by the United Nations and French government troops, forces loyal to Outtara have made significant gains, and over the past several days have reportedly cornered Gbagbo in a bunker at his residence in the country's economic capital, Abidjan. Earlier today, talks were underway between Gbagbo and representatives of the French government concerning Gbagbo's exit from power, but with these talks reportedly having failed, the situation remains fluid and dangerous. Gathered here are images from the recent conflict in Ivory Coast. [See also "An Era of Intervention?" by Max Fisher.]

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