Earlier today, I wrote about my voyages into the land of German Chocolate Cake.  Or maybe "near" the land of German Chocolate Cake would be a more accurate term, since I did not have the necessary ingredients (evaporated milk), or, frankly, the will to make a true German Chocolate Cake.


Reader MacAdvisor informs me that I wasn't even close.  Apparently, I am the culinary equivalent of Christopher Colombus:

Once again I leap into to the breach to save the proper name. The name of the cake you attempted to make was a German's Chocolate Cake. Note the possessive with German. Englishman Sam German created a brand of dark baking chocolate named after him, German's Sweet Chocolate. In 1957, the year of my birth, a Dallas, Texas, homemaker submitted the original recipe for "German's Chocolate Cake"to a local newspaper recipe contest. This recipe used German's Sweet Chocolate and was the winner of the contest.

Sales of Baker's Chocolate are said to have increased by as much as 73% from widespread publication of the recipe and the cake would become a national staple. To this day, it still has nothing to do with Germany and everything with Sam German. The chocolate is still available today with the brand owned by Kraft. You can see the original recipe at:

http://www.kraftrecipes.com/re...

The German's Chocolate, you will note, goes into the cake, not the frosting. Making a black devil's food cake with carmel coconut and pecan frosting is not a German's Chocolate Cake any more than Eggs Benedict can be made without the ham.

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