Alternatively titled, you can take TNC out the ghetto, but you can't take the ghetto out of TNC.


So this morning I'm in line at the Charlotte airport, and the line is rather long--but not New York LaGuardia long, we're talking Charlotte long. So there's a dude behind me steady mumbling his complaints about the line. Yeah, yeah whatever, I'm thinking. Play your position and keep it moving. But once we get pass the ID and boarding pass check, dude straight cuts the line. Like jumps in front of me and like three other people.

No one says anything at all. And then someone, clearly pissed off, yells "How you gonna just cut the line like that?!??" It took a second to realize that that someone was in fact me. He responds by noting that he has a flight to catch. To which I respond, "Dude, that's just rude." Somewhat shamed he returned and took his place behind me.

Now, in that short confrontation I was moved by two diametrically opposed hood impulses: 

1.) The notion of disrespect. The idea that dude had basically just tried to punk me and everyone else who'd waited in line.

2.) The notion of "He could be packing." I was rather shocked that I said anything because I generally believe that in a society as armed as this one, confrontation should, in the main, be avoided. I mean dude could have been just a nut-job and turned around and maced me or something.

And yet I find myself, more often then may be healthy, listening to the first impulse. But then post-incident I always think, "You dumbass, let it go, You're gonna get yourself killed!" It's not really fear talking, as much as it's my more rational side which I think of as being "me." I don't think of myself as particularly angry or irrational person. And yet it's amazing to see how many things I do that aren't thought-out, that are just raw emotional responses. 

I don't really believe that society is ruder today than at some earlier point. I do think that airports, post-9/11 are a lot ruder. 

Oh well, got a plane to catch. Peace Charlotte.

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