My errors this week.

1. In a post about the Republican Attorneys General lawsuit against health care reform legislation, I made the non-lawyer's common mistake of presuming that absence was ... evidence. I noted that a reader noted that the complaint contained no case citations .. as if that was unusual, Not only is it not unusual, it is required.  Federal complaints are not supposed to have case cites. In fact, they aren't allowed. So -- phooey on me for not asking a lawyer about that.

2. In a Wednesday night post, I wrote that the timing for the House to re-pass the fixed reconciliation bill was such that the vote would not occur until Monday. Yesterday morning, when the House decided to vote Thursday, I neglected to update the post.

3. In a post on how April will be "nuclear month" for the White House, I predicted that the Senate would begin to debate ratification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. In fact, as officials told me later, that debate is at least six months away. The ratification of the new START treaty will take up the Senate's time.

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