I think it's obvious that Mike Huckabee is an ambitious guy, and like most ambitious politicians he has no doubt entertained the thought that a GOP loss in this fall's Presidential election might end up redounding to his benefit. (That is, assuming he isn't on the ticket, which seems pretty unlikely no matter what James Pethokoukis's sources say.) But it would take a lot more evidence than what Bob Novak musters in this column to make me believe that Huck - whose de facto alliance with McCain was one of the factors driving the Arizona Senator's primary victory - has secretly allied with "the bitter-end opposition" to McCain among his fellow Evangelicals. Here's the substance of Novak's reporting:

... the word is that some evangelicals dispute Huckabee's support. One experienced, credible activist in Christian politics who would not let his name be used told me that Huckabee, in personal conversation with him, had embraced the concept that an Obama presidency might be what the American people deserve. That fits what has largely been a fringe position among evangelicals: that the pain of an Obama presidency is in keeping with the Bible's prophecy.



As anyone who's ever had a "personal conversation" with someone pushing a peculiar point of view knows all too well, the requirements of politeness (of the "up to a point, Lord Copper" variety, if nothing else) make it very easy to leave your interlocutor with the impression that you've "embraced the concept" that they're pushing on you, when in fact you've done nothing of the sort. Maybe Mike Huckabee really does believe, with Patrick Henry's Michael Farris, that "an Obama plague-like presidency" is just what the Book of Revelation ordered. (Though it's worth noting that Novak's evidence that Farris holds this view is likewise based on hearsay.) But given the ample primary-season evidence that Huck has a major-league man-crush on the presumptive GOP nominee, I'd like to see a little more evidence before I "embrace the concept" that the Arkansas Governor might be part of McCain's "Christian problem."

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