First, an enormous thank you to Reihan, for being so prolific and wonderful in my absence. Second - well, I'm not sure what's second. I went cold turkey for the past sixteen days - no blogs, no email, no internet at all except to check weather reports in Greece - and there's something more than a little overwhelming about stepping back into the river of information and realizing that I need to start coming up with opinions again. At the moment, my only recently-formulated perspectives involve the books (yes, books - I'd almost forgotten about them) that I read while I was away: I've decided that Borges, whom I'd barely dipped into before the last two weeks, is flat-out fantastic (by no means an original opinion), that Dennis Lehane is a vastly better crime novelist than Ian Rankin, and that The Looming Tower, while certainly a remarkable feat of reportage, is overrated as a work of narrative nonfiction. Beyond that, I've got nothing, and it'll probably be a day or so before I get back in the rhythm of blogging. (I have an awful lot of baseball reading to catch up on, among other things.)

So ... it's good to be back (well, sort of), I hope you missed me, and I'll deliver more content, I promise, as soon as I finish readjusting.

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