Contents | January/Feburary 2003

Jedediah Purdy: Further reading for "Suspicious Minds"
 
For the definitive work on civic engagement in America, with an excellent chapter on interpersonal trust, see Robert Putnam's Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community,Touchstone Books, 2001. The book has a Web site at www.bowlingalone.com, which in turn has a companion Web site, affiliated with Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, at www.bettertogether.org. For Better Together's report on civic engagement click on: www.bettertogether.org/report.php3.

In Trust: The Social Virtues and the Creation of Prosperity, Touchstone Books, 1996, Francis Fukuyama argues that national levels of interpersonal trust and civic engagement correlate strongly with economic health.

Other readings:

Democracy and Trust, Mark Warren, ed., Cambridge University Press, 1999.

Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust:

Trust and Governance,V.A. Braithwaite and Margaret Levi, eds., RSF, 1998.
Trust in Society, Karen Cook, ed., RSF, 2001.
Trust and Trustworthiness, Russell Hardin, RSF, 2002.

For survey data on trust in various institutions, see the Harris Poll at: www.harrisinteractive.com/harris_poll/index.asp?PID=283, or the National Election Studies data at: www.umich.edu/~nes/nesguide/gd-index.htm, under heading 5.A.

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