Contents | January/Feburary 2003

Ted Halstead: Further reading for "The American Paradox"
 
Ted Halstead is the author of two cover stories for The Atlantic Monthly:
A Politics for Generation X www.theatlantic.com/issues/99aug/9908genx.htm, and If the GDP is Up, Why is America Down? www.theatlantic.com/politics/ecbig/gdp.htm.

For further reading on what a new social contract might look like, see:
The Radical Center: The Future of American Politics by Ted Halstead and Michael Lind.

There are a number of good sources for country-by-country statistics. For stats on other advanced democracies, click on: Society at a Glance: OECD Social Indicators at www.sourceoecd.org/data/cm/00004866/8101061e.pdf, or OECD in Figures 2002 at www1.oecd.org/publications/e-book/0102071E.PDF.

For stats on almost all countries, click on: United Nations Human Development Indicators at www.undp.org/hdr2001/back.pdf, or—my favorite—The CIA World Factbook at www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/.

Once you've selected a country profile to look at, click on the right icon above each category to see data from that category for every country in the world.

For pages that are a little more fun, see: Infonation: The United Nations 'Cyberschoolbus' at www.un.org/Pubs/CyberSchoolBus/infonation/e_infonation.htm.

Select from the country and data menus to generate your own table.

The European Institute of Japanese Studies has a quirky list compiled from several sources, at: www.hhs.se/personal/suzuki/o-English/UnitedStates.html.

Categories include number of McDonald's restaurants per unit population, per capita coffee consumption, parasitic disease rates, and so forth.

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