Contents | January/Feburary 2003

Ricardo Bayon: Further reading for "The Fuel Subsidy We Need"
 
For some good discussions of a world of hydrogen-driven cars, see Chapter 2 of Natural Capitalism by Paul Hawken, Amory Lovins, and L. Hunter Lovins.

Worldwatch (www.worldwatch.org) has also put out two excellent publications on Hydrogen energy and energy more generally. They are both by Seth Dunn and are called, respectively, Hydrogen Futures: Towards a Sustainable Energy System and Micropower: the Next Electrical Era.

Several Web sites follow the technology, business, and politics behind fuel cells. Two of the best are:
www.fuelcells.org; and
www.fuelcelltoday.com.

To get a sense of how one oil company views hydrogen fuel cells, see a document published by Royal/Dutch Shell entitled "Energy Needs, Choices, and Possibilities: Scenarios to 2050." It is available at www2.shell.com/home/media-en/downloads/51852.pdf

For an excellent overview of the impact of oil on the US economy, see a paper by David Greene and Nataliya Tishchishyna entitled "Costs of Oil Dependence: a 2000 update." It can be downloaded from the Web site of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at: www-cta.ornl.gov/Publications/ORNL_TM2000_152.pdf.

For ideas of where the current Administration sees the future of energy, it is instructive to look at the Administration's "National Energy Policy" published in May of 2001 (available at www.whitehouse.gov). Though conservation, the environment, and renewable energy all have their own chapters in the policy, most of money proposed in the paper goes to coal, oil, gas, nuclear energy and other traditional sources of energy. The policy has been soundly criticized by environmental organizations such as the Union of Concerned Scientists (www.ucsusa.org) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (www.nrdc.org).

For those interested in renewable energy more generally, the Web sites of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (www.nrel.gov) and the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (www.eren.doe.gov) have a wealth of information and useful links.

For specific information on solar energy, see: the Web site of the International Solar Energy Society (www.ises.org);

For specific information on wind energy see the Web site of the American Wind Energy Association (www.awea.org)

For an overview of how the US has been losing ground to Europe and Japan on Solar energy see an article I wrote for The American Prospect in January of 2002 entitled "Unenlightened."

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