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What Do You Know?
Jonathan Ernst / Reuters
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Each week, we collect the most surprising facts from our coverage and create a five-question quiz. Can you get all the answers right?

Show 25 Newer Notes

What Do You Know ... About Household Chores?

Zak Bickel / The Atlantic

In this week’s Atlantic coverage, our writers explored what’s behind the gender chore gap, the history of “spooktacular,” the science of cashmere sweaters, the barriers facing refugee students, the “love pirates” of the 1900s, and more.

Can you remember the key facts? Find the answers to this week’s questions in the articles linked above—or go ahead and test your memory now:

For further tricky questions and surprising facts, try last week’s quiz, and subscribe to our daily newsletter.

Katie Martin / The Atlantic

In this week’s Atlantic coverage, our writers explored the legacy of William F. Buckley, how the LSAT favors the rich, what gives applicants for lucrative jobs an advantage, the coming avocado shortage, America’s favorite fall vegetable, and more.

Can you remember the key facts? Find the answers to this week’s questions in the articles linked above—or go ahead and test your memory now:

For further tricky questions and surprising facts, try last week’s quiz, and subscribe to our daily newsletter.

Katie Martin / The Atlantic

In this week’s Atlantic coverage, our writers explored the key points of the tattoo industry, the life of a pizza delivery driver, what’s wrecking the world’s sewers, the poison pervading Victorian products, the tech history of the Statue of Liberty, and much more.

Can you remember the key facts? Find the answers to this week’s questions in the articles linked above—or go ahead and test your memory now:

For further tricky questions and surprising facts, try last week’s quiz, and subscribe to our daily newsletter.

Katie Martin / The Atlantic

In this week’s Atlantic coverage, our writers explored the laws that govern corporations across America, the pressures that give some workers the highest levels of stress, a clash between artists and politicians, why there are so many babies on Facebook, how an early feminist took a stand for sexual equality, and much more.

Can you remember the key facts? Find the answers to this week’s questions in the articles linked above—or go ahead and test your memory now:

For further tricky questions and surprising facts, try last week’s quiz, and subscribe to our daily newsletter.

Katie Martin / The Atlantic

In this week’s Atlantic coverage, our writers explored new research on an underappreciated organ, how to stay warm at the office, the most violent animals, how high-school football players protest, what it takes to get wine from the vineyard to the table, and much more.

Can you remember the key facts? Find the answers to this week’s questions in the articles linked above—or go ahead and test your memory now:

For further tricky questions and surprising facts, try last week’s quiz, and subscribe to our daily newsletter.

Katie Martin / The Atlantic

In this week’s Atlantic coverage, our writers explored the psychology of weight loss, the real habits of Facebook users,  the temperaments of different dogs, the job prospects of college grads, what happens to stolen guns, and much more.

Can you remember the key facts? Find the answers to this week’s questions in the articles linked above—or go ahead and test your memory now:

For further tricky questions and surprising facts, try last week’s quiz, and subscribe to our daily newsletter.

Katie Martin / The Atlantic

In this week’s Atlantic coverage, our writers explored the links between prosperity and well-being, the wealth of corporate executives, the most troubling myths about birth control, the truth about undocumented immigrants and taxes, how to grow kosher meat in a lab, and much more.

Can you remember the key facts? Find the answers to this week’s questions in the articles linked above—or go ahead and test your memory now:

For further tricky questions and surprising facts, subscribe to our daily newsletter.

1. Spaces between words were invented in fifth-century ____________, to make Latin bibles easier to read.

See answer after the jump, or find it here.

2. The New England slang term “to be on one’s beanwater” means “to feel ____________.”

See answer after the jump, or find it here.

3. The first film ever to depict text onscreen was released in ____________.

See answer after the jump, or find it here.

4. ____________ percent of Americans believe that increasing diversity makes their country better—compared to 36 percent of people in Sweden and 26 percent of people in France.

See answer after the jump, or find it here.

5. A new study suggests that eating ____________ is crucial to fighting viral infections.

See answer after the jump, or find it here.

Phil Noble / Reuters