‘The Very Real Racism’ Within the Black Community

An African American reader, Allene, wants to start a conversation about the “misconceptions about being black in America.” (She also highlights the trailer for a documentary on shadism, Dark Girls, seen above.) Allene writes:

I understand that you all are busy—very busy—with the convention this week, but I have to share with you a very different aspect of being black in America today.

Racism is a thing regardless of how the media handles or mishandles the relationship or the non-existence of a relationship between black and white Americans. So, for the sake of establishing a common ground, let’s accept that racism is a thing.

There is another, rarely examined aspect of what it means to be black in America. Modern-day black activists (hell, a whole lot of black folks in general), require other black people to be BLACK first—that is, to tote around on their bent backs and black shoulders the eons of tortured black history as if that history is a current-day reality while denying who they are as individuals.

Black people desire equal rights, to be sure, but when young black people go to racially-mixed high schools and colleges, exactly why are all black students required to only support black student organizations? Why do some of these same, educated, young black people deny other young black people from the human activity of just being a human being? The worst of this aspect of being a black college student in America is the judgement that happens in those organizations. “You ain’t black enough; why you got pretty hair—your momma or daddy white?"

For the life of me, I cannot understand how black people are so quick to recognize racism as directed towards them from whites, Latinos, Asians, et al, and miss the very real racism that exists within our race from one another.