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Atlantic readers and staffers debate the value of the serial comma, the limits of wordplay, and more.

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Your Oxford Comments

Calling all friends and foes of the serial comma! In just a few moments, we’ll be tackling the greatest grammatical debate of our time: Should you use an Oxford comma? Emma Green, having previously defended all-things Oxford comma, will be advocating for said comma on Facebook Live at 3pm EST today. Meanwhile, we welcome your arguments against, and you can submit them to me in real-time, so be sure to tune in!

While we wait, here are four arguments submitted by readers already.

The confusion argument:

Here’s a fun one for you. “I had a party last weekend. I invited the president, Barack Obama, and three of my friends.”

So: How many people did I invite? If the correct answer is five (which it is, because I invited the president of something other than the United States), that means that the Oxford comma created confusion that could have been avoided if I'd omitted it. “I invited the president, Barack Obama and three of my friends” clearly indicates that Barack Obama and the president, in this context, are separate people.

And before you say “this is a preposterous example where confusion could be easily avoided by an author with good sense,” realize that you now know exactly how I feel about every sentence trotted out in defense of the Oxford comma by its fans.

The “speedbump on an exit ramp” argument:

At the risk of offending E.B. White and William Strunk, Kill The Oxford Comma. It’s like a speedbump on an exit ramp. It jars you and serves no purpose. The word “and” already tells you the next word is part of the list. You don't need an unnatural pause before it.

And yes, I have 30 years in print journalism.

The “sometimes I use it, sometimes I don’t” argument:

I think it’s so funny how people get super heated about it! Sometimes it makes sense to use it and sometimes it doesn’t. So sometimes I use it and sometimes I don’t! (Which I fully realize is blasphemy to many. And I was trained as a journo to us AP style.) If the meaning of your sentence is changed by your punctuation, then you need to look at your whole sentence structure, not just the comma. It’s a symptom of unclear writing.

The racism/elitism argument:

I do. I care.

I care for the sake of the clarity, flow, and musicality of prose. I care because words matter, punctuation matters, and there is no other logical position besides being pro-Oxford comma. I care because I like jokes about my parents, God, and Stalin. (Actually, in that case, the joke only works if you take out the Oxford comma, which I refuse to do on principle.)

Some people, apparently, disagree—including those who follow the AP’s style book, which is most traditional newspaper reporters. I am prepared to do battle with these foes. This Friday, June 24, at 3pm EST, we will host a live video debate on our Facebook page: me vs. readers / internet riffraff, on the topic of the Oxford comma. Besides its merits, which are clear, the following questions may be considered:

Oxford comma or serial comma?

Best Oxford-comma joke?

Is this Vampire Weekend song actually coherent?

Have thoughts? Hate the Oxford comma? By all means, enter the fray: hello@theatlantic.com. But beware: I have gotten into fights over the Oxford comma at weddings, in the Atlantic offices, and at bars. Bring it on. I have no fear, no doubt, and no shame about tedious pedantry.