Notes

First Drafts, Conversations, Stories in Progress

Helping You Find the Perfect Gift
Zak Bickel / The Atlantic
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Who’s the hardest person on your holiday gift list to shop for? Readers sent us descriptions of their tricky recipients, and our staffers brainstormed some custom ideas. Read on for some last-minute inspiration. Got another suggestion for what to give these folks? Send us a note—hello@theatlantic.com.

Show 8 Newer Notes

Age: 46

Place: Michigan

Relationship: wife

From the gift-giver:

Interests are her teenage boys. One is a senior who will be moving out in August. The other is a sophomore. She likes coffee, and Oprah's Book Club (but wishes she had more time to read). Busy being part of the sandwich generation—taking care of kids and her parents. She dreams of leaving Michigan for somewhere warmer, or at least a vacation to get away and recharge, but can't as it's not affordable now.

Any gift they’ve loved?

Something thoughtful. Pandora beads with a meaning behind them.

We recommend: coffee subscription (from $16/shipment) and copper coffee press ($39.95)

A perfect cup of joe is no Hawaiian getaway, but it brings its own kind of warmth and tranquility—especially when spiked with just the right amount of coconut liqueur, and served alongside breakfast in bed. You can tap into your wife’s love of coffee with a monthly subscription from Stumptown or Craft Coffee. For bonus presentation points, pair it with a beautiful copper French press from Bodum (and maybe a mini-bottle of Kahlua). Not only does the coffee subscription offer her a new flavor every 30 days, its monthly arrival can serve as a regular reminder for you and your sons to pamper your wife, so she can unwind with a good book.

Other ideas:

Got another suggestion for this recipient? Send your ideas to hello@theatlantic.com.

Age: 82

Place: Chicago

Relationship: grandfather

From the gift-giver:

Youngest of 18 children; his father died when he was 9 years old so my grandfather dropped out of school and began working to support his family. He worked in sugar cane fields and as a police officer, and after bringing his wife and children to the United States, he worked in multiple factories, nearly severing a thumb in a machine accident once. He didn't retire until his 70s. Many of his brothers liked to sing, as does he, but he insists he's no good at singing (which isn't true). He enjoys telling stories about his siblings, he loves watching boxing matches, he doesn't smoke or drink, yet bizarrely, people outside the family would always give him bottles of wine for Christmas for years, so he has a storage of unopened booze in the basement. He has a poodle/terrier mix he rescued named Spike (definitely NOT named by me after a Buffy the Vampire Slayer character).

He cooks and is very, very good at it even though he usually can't eat most of the best things he makes due to recent health issues, and therefore has to have the toned down no-salt option for everything. He does not speak English despite having lived in the U.S. for nearly 50 years and owning a full set of Ingles Sin Barreras tapes for nearly that same amount of time. When I was growing up, my parents didn't speak Spanish at home so I was never able to understand him or communicate with him, which caused some distance between us. I had to learn Spanish in high-school classes; because of this, I didn't learn until I was a teenager how funny my grandpa is and that he really enjoys puns and jokes.

Any gift they’ve loved?

I believe he liked a domino set I purchased for him a couple years ago, although admittedly I've never seen him play it.

We recommend: Guillermo Álvarez Guedes “best of the best” CD collection ($59.94)

Grandpa sounds like a hoot, so an audio comedy extravaganza could tap right into that. He might already know Guedes’s material well, in which case the CDs will be a nostalgic treat. Even if he does, listening to them with you would be a whole new experience. The experiential presents are often the best, especially with older friends and relatives. You can do this one with him from the comfort of the couch, in the kitchen mid-meal prep, or while on a drive around his favorite Chicago haunts. Bonus: Listening with Gramps gives you a chance to work on your Spanish swear vocabulary.

Other ideas:

Got another suggestion for this recipient? Send your ideas to hello@theatlantic.com.

Age: 23

Place: Boston

Relationship: girlfriend

From the gift-giver:

She likes Bob's Burgers, Parks and Recreation, and Archer. She wants a puppy but can't have one right now because of the costs, and she doesn't want to ignore the two cats she already has. She enjoys traveling, cooking, and animals, and she loves Future and Drake.​

Any gift they’ve loved?

We've only been dating three months, and her birthday has passed. I got her a Li’l Sebastian T-shirt and she loved that, but I know I have to step my game up.

We recommend: couples cooking classes ($150)

As much as I love Li'l Sebastian (may he rest in peace), you’re right: You should step up your game for the first big holiday you’re celebrating together. I tend to think experiential gifts are the way to go when a relationship is new. What about a date-night cooking class? Since you’re in Boston, check out The Cambridge School of Culinary Arts, which offers sessions on tapas and classic French cuisine. Another, pricier option in Boston is Stir ($165-$225 per person), the former home of Top Chef’s Kristen Kish. The January schedule isn’t up yet, but you might be able to squeeze into “Classic Trattoria Cooking” at the end of December.

Other ideas:

Got another suggestion for this recipient? Send your ideas to hello@theatlantic.com.

Age: 19

Place: Saskatoon, Canada

Relationship: step-nephew

From the gift-giver:

My brother’s stepson seems to be a typical 19-year-old in many ways. He likes video games, hanging out with friends and drinking with them. But the problem is that I don't really know him all that well—which is why it is so tricky for me to buy for him. I need to find him something relatively inexpensive (looking for under the $25 mark), but something that a kid his age would like.

Any gift they’ve loved?

Not really... I mean, I know that my brother and his wife once set up an entertainment center in his room (TV, speakers, video game console, etc.) as a gift for one of his birthdays. He loved that, but who wouldn't love something so extravagant?  I don't know about any inexpensive, small gift that he loved. My mom once gave him a pan of S'mores cookie bars that she made that he really liked. But, ever since then, many people have given him versions of S'mores and I think he's a little sick of it.​

We recommend: the Pickpocket ($25)

Ahh, a typical 19-year-old boy—in other words, one of the most opaque kinds of humans there is. Since you mentioned he likes to drink with friends, I thought a cool bottle opener might be cheery—every beer lover could use one on his keychain, and they can be kind of fun to play with. The Pickpocket is versatile and only costs $20—it's got cool jagged edges and could possibly be used to pull apart a melting S'more, if he wants to double up on how he puts it to work. It's also a gift that will grow with him—sturdy enough to last, subtle enough to not seem immature, fly enough to inspire envy at bonfires, or whatever it is that 19-year-olds do for fun.

Other ideas:

Got another suggestion for this recipient? Send your ideas to hello@theatlantic.com.

Age: 36

Place: Los Angeles

Relationship: younger sister

From the gift-giver:

Beautiful home, not a lot of storage space, often Airbnb's it—no room for tchotchkes or housewares others have picked out. No kids. One dog and one husband (who is easy to shop for!). Great shopper for clothes and would not like anything I picked out. (Have tried.) Don't think she uses cookbooks. Latest novels are great but blah from me every year! Excellent taste. Tight budget (mine). Would like to make or get her something fabulous that won't bust my budget, and something she would actually like. That is the tough part.

Any gift they’ve loved?

Not sure I have every succeeded with a gift for her, come to think of it. Now I feel terrible.

We recommend: gift certificate to a Korean day spa ($15-$130)

Well, it wouldn’t be the holidays if we didn’t feel inadequate. Don’t fret! Chic younger sisters are tough (trust me—I am one). All the savvy Angelenos I know rave about this Korean day spa, located in L.A.’s Koreatown neighborhood. You might not be able to channel her style perfectly, but you can certainly get ahead of any stressful days she’s got down the line. The spa rituals, though on the pricier end of the spectrum, sound heavenly, but she’s also bound to appreciate a free mani, pedi, facial, or massage from her thoughtful sis.

Other ideas:

Got another suggestion for this recipient? Send your ideas to hello@theatlantic.com.