Taxi Bigotry Isn't Black and White

Doug Glanville, the former pro baseball player, pens a personal essay for us on the persistent problem of cab drivers refusing service because of race. This passage is notably nuanced:

It’s worth noting that in my experience, the drivers who most blatantly refused me service have never been white. According to a 2004 The New York Times report, 84 percent of New York City cab drivers are immigrants (the vast majority are “of color”), just like my father was in the mid-1950s. English was not the first language of the driver who refused me at LAX. This fact complicated the story for me. On the one hand, it was sobering to see how newcomers to the United States could not only adopt longstanding racial and institutional biases, but entrench them even further. On the other hand, I knew that I was in a position of power, and that I was in danger of making assumptions myself.

But many readers furrowed their brows:

I was with Glanville until he mentioned “how newcomers to the United States could not only adopt longstanding racial and institutional biases, but entrench them even further.”