The Atlantic Daily: Most Americans Don’t Hate Their Job

The Great Resignation may be less about worker angst than it seems, a reporter argues. Plus: Our writer once (accidentally) helped get someone canceled. Now he has a better idea.

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox.


The country’s latest jobs report is a dose of good news for an economy still struggling with inflation: The United States added more than 400,000 new positions in March, continuing its rebound from dramatic losses in the spring of 2020.

Americans are returning to workplaces transformed, as we’ve written, by the pandemic. But recently, two of our writers have argued against the prevailing wisdom (and comments from a certain reality star), reporting that the bond between worker bees and corporate hive remains as sticky as ever.

  • Most Americans don’t hate their job. “The Great Resignation isn’t a dramatic shift in worker sentiment. It’s a dramatic shift in worker opportunity,” my colleague Derek Thompson argues. “Resignations are rising because people are seeing more job listings, not because they’re feeling more Marxist.”
  • Work gives us identity, belonging, and meaning. And “contrary to the new wisdom,” the sociologist Carolyn Chen writes, “work does love us back.” If, that is, you’re employed in Silicon Valley.
A woman wearing a grey sweater and white turtleneck holds a net
A volunteer weaves a camouflage net for the war effort in Lviv, Ukraine.(Yuriy Dyachyshyn / AFP / Getty)

Explore the week that was. The war in Ukraine, fire, flood, and the Slap: Our senior editor Alan Taylor wraps up photos from the major news events of the week.

Read. Feeling a bit peckish? Nosh on these 12 unforgettable food scenes from throughout literature. In this week’s Books Briefing, Emma Sarappo writes that lying is its own form of storytelling.

Watch. Skip Morbius, which features a one-note performance from Jared Leto as a vampire. Instead, stream an Oscar-worthy film from last year’s set: CODA is on Apple TV+, Dune is on HBO Max, and The Power of the Dog is on Netflix.

Or go back even further and spend this Friday night revisiting our critic David Sims’s list of 30 movies from the past several decades that are unlike anything you’ve seen before.

Listen. Scam TV is everywhere. On this week’s episode of The Review, our critics discuss the recent spate of shows like The Dropout—and what it reveals about this moment in American culture.

Latest dispatches:

In Deep Shtetl, Yair Rosenberg explains his part in (accidentally) getting the celebrated author Alice Walker canceled. Instead, he writes, she should be held accountable.


Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox.