The Atlantic Daily: Feminism Has Never Been Enough

Two writers challenge common ideas about feminism and gender.

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International Women’s Day, which was Tuesday, started as a socialist holiday. “Over time, as it became mainstream,” Imani Perry writes in her Atlantic newsletter, Unsettled Territory, “it lost the specific association with working-class and colonized women.”

Xochitl Gonzalez first perceived this loss in the ’90s, during her college years, when she returned from studying abroad in Florence—where “thousands of Italian women took to the streets in celebration, rage, and support and love of one another” on the holiday—and noticed how Americans barely seemed to observe it.

Xochitl, who writes the Atlantic newsletter Brooklyn, Everywhere, and Imani use the occasions of this year’s International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month to ask provocative questions about our shared understandings of sexism, feminism, and much more.

  • Consider womanism. “When thinking about being a Latina woman in America today, I find myself growing more and more dubious of a term I was suspicious of to begin with: feminism,” Xochitl writes. “Contemporary feminism has begun to seem, as the critic Jessa Crispin has argued, like it’s operating under the same terms of the patriarchy it’s meant to be working to erode.”
  • Aim for gender liberation. Imani argues that, this Women’s History Month, we “ought to draw attention to arguably the most gender-vulnerable people in our present moment: trans, gender-nonconforming, and nonbinary children and their families who are being legally targeted in multiple states for not complying with traditional rules about gender.”

Read the latest on the Russian war on Ukraine. Olena Halushka argues that the West isn’t doing enough to save her homeland. And Tom Nichols offers a guide to the nuclear terms and concepts we’d once hoped we could forget. Find all our coverage here.

Read. First, a short story: “Cromer” by Paul Yoon, a tale of a relationship complicated by family history.

Deborah Cohen revisits the book that unleashed American grief: 1949’s Death Be Not Proud, by John Gunther.

Lastly, the historian Marci Shore lists nine books to read to understand the war in Ukraine.

Watch. Turning Red, out today in select theaters and on Disney+, is Pixar’s cleverest film in years.

The historian and author Joshua First rounds up eight excellent movies (and one TV show) from Ukrainian filmmakers that “serve as excellent primers of a rich artistic tradition.”

Listen. On this week’s episode of our culture podcast, The Review, our critics discuss Drive My Car, the heavily Oscar-nominated film adaptation of a Haruki Murakami short story.

Change your clocks. This weekend, time will spring forward by an hour. If you’re feeling grumpy over the transition, read about the family that has chosen to live on daylight saving time year-round.


Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox.