The Atlantic Daily: Have We Sprung Forward for the Last Time?

Americans are already grappling with the potential ramifications of making daylight saving time permanent.

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Eyes with clocks spinning in them
Adam Maida / The Atlantic

This week, the United States Senate did something surprising: It unanimously passed a bill to end the traditional changing of the clocks—one that would suspend Americans in a permanent state of daylight saving. Even some senators were surprised, BuzzFeed News reports. The legislation passed under a process called unanimous consent, wherein the body can skip the rigamarole and jump to a simple yay, as long as there are no objections. (None were raised.)

The act still needs the approval of the House and the signature of President Joe Biden to become law. But online and off, Americans are already grappling with the potential ramifications: What would a world without changing our clocks look like? And would that be a good thing?

“There’s no good biological reason to change the time twice a year, but most health experts support ending daylight saving time, not making it permanent,” Olga Khazan reported last year. “Still, experts say the bigger problem for health is the changing of the clock, not the precise hour America ends up on.”

  • Daylight saving time is bad for teenagers. “If the House passes this bill and it becomes law, we’ll face very long, very dark mornings every winter,” the family therapists Heather Turgeon and Julie Wright write, noting that teenagers have a natural delay in their biological clock. Teens waking up for school will “miss most of their REM sleep, or dream sleep, which happens in the early-morning hours and is essential to mental health.”
  • One family already took the plunge. Tali and Scott Richards in Connecticut decided not to change their clocks in the fall of 2020. They considered their experiment a success, Olga wrote in 2021.
People walk among anti-tank barriers placed to protect historic landmarks in Odessa, Ukraine
Scott Peterson / Getty

Revisit the week that was. Get our latest coverage of Russia’s war on Ukraine. Our senior editor Alan Taylor compiled a gallery of photos from around the world.

Read. Our staff writer Anne Applebaum, who has extensively chronicled the rise of authoritarianism around the world, argues that now is a good moment to revisit Hannah Arendt’s The Origins of Totalitarianism.

Watch. Deep Water, starring Ben Affleck and Ana de Armas, is bringing sexy thrillers back. It’s out on Hulu today.

Listen. Charli XCX’s latest album offers a dose of much-needed springtime joy, our critic Spencer Kornhaber writes.

Today’s dispatches

In this week’s edition of The Third Rail, David French sees a glimmer of hope that the GOP can recover from conspiracy theories. Charlie Warzel’s guest in Galaxy Brain shares lessons he’s learned from 19 years in the metaverse. Lizzie Plaugic and Kaitlyn Tiffany of Famous People attend a party for The Drift, a hip magazine.


Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox.