The Atlantic Daily: America’s Approach to School Closures Is Unusual

Omicron is forcing us to revisit one of the most sensitive and consequential debates of the pandemic: what to do about schools.

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Omicron is leading to school closures and reigniting familiar debates around the safety of in-person learning. In Chicago, public schools remain closed amid a dispute with the teachers’ union over when to switch to remote instruction. Districts in other parts of the country have reported staffing shortages.

Once again, policy makers, administrators, and parents alike are being forced to weigh concerns about the overall well-being of students and teachers against the risks of coronavirus transmission.

The news in three sentences:

(1) Diplomatic talks between the United States and Russia on Ukraine made little progress.

(2) A space heater is suspected to have ignited the fire that killed at least 17 people in the Bronx over the weekend.

(3) Robert Durst, the convicted killer once profiled in HBO’s The Jinx, died in prison at 78.

Today’s Atlantic-approved activity:

In “About It,” the poet Geffrey Davis describes the thousand little clicks / of pleasure experienced when putting together a puzzle.

A break from the news:

This 64-year-old man expects he could live to 160. Here’s how he plans to spend his time.


Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox.