The Atlantic Daily: Seven Ways to Spend That Extra Hour

Once a year, Americans get an extra hour of weekend thanks to daylight saving time. Spend yours wisely.

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People standing in front of giant clock
(Peter Marlow / Magnum)

Anyone who’s ever woken up disoriented or mourned an early winter sunset knows the scourge that is daylight saving time. The changing of the clocks, particularly in the spring, has been linked to an uptick in heart attacks and millions of dollars’ worth of lost productivity. In recent years, the country’s seen pushes at the national and state levels to end the practice for good, but until then, we’re stuck. (Unless, of course, you want to be radical like this family and just choose to live on it year round.)

But the good news is this weekend, you’ve got an extra hour. Below, we offer seven suggestions for how to make use of those extra 60 minutes come Sunday morning.

1. Check in on the state of American democracy. Donald Trump could very much be back on the ballot in 2024, David Frum warns, campaigning on “nostalgia for the strong pre-pandemic economy, plus resentment over the outcome of the vote in 2020.”

2. Stream something excellent. Introducing, Selma Blair, available on Discovery+, is an unconventional and poignant celebrity documentary about the Cruel Intentions actor’s experience with multiple sclerosis, our culture writer Shirley Li tells me. Or, ahead of Thanksgiving, indulge in Padma Lakshmi’s Taste the Nation, an unsparing excavation of America’s culinary heritage that just debuted a holiday edition. The show streams on Hulu.

3. Get that flu shot you’ve been putting off. It’s not too late: Although the CDC suggests everyone get the job done by October, shots are better late than never, given that flu season doesn’t typically peak until February. Flu viruses, which all but disappeared last year, could return stronger than before, my colleague Katherine J. Wu warns.

4. Read our latest magazine cover story. McKay Coppins goes inside Alden Global Capital, a secretive hedge fund that is snapping up local newsrooms across the country, wringing them for cash, and leaving them to die.

5. Go on a walk. A stroll can be good for your mental health. To help set the pace, try this upbeat walking playlist, deejayed by our culture writer Spencer Kornhaber. You can also stream it on our Spotify page.

6. Preview the next decade of space exploration. Astronomers recently decided that NASA should build a new space telescope to search for other Earths, around their own suns, our space reporter Marina Koren notes. “If that vision crystallizes into reality, it could change human knowledge as profoundly as the moment Copernicus realized that Earth wasn’t the center of the universe.”

7. Sleep. Don’t overthink it.


Decorative lights are seen on the balconies of a high-rise during Diwali in Noida, India
Decorative lights are seen on the balconies of a high-rise during Diwali in Noida, India. (Anushree Fadnavis / Reuters)

Explore the week that was. Our senior editor Alan Taylor rounds up photographs from around the world.

Read. In this week’s Books Briefing, my colleague Kate Cray rounds up books that offer a new way to look at nature.

Watch. The new Princess Diana film, Spencer, functions less as a precise biopic and more as a “an effective emotional portrait” that is “surprisingly arch and funny,” our critic David Sims writes. Meanwhile, The Souvenir Part II proves that sequels aren’t just for blockbusters.

Get caught up on the latest episode of HBO’s Succession before the next one airs on Sunday.

Listen. Struggling to find purpose in your profession? On How to Build a Happy Life, Arthur C. Brooks discusses the secret to squeezing meaning from work. On The Review, our critics revisit the 2002 horror movie The Ring to see if it holds up. (It does.)


Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox.