The Atlantic Daily: Where the End of Quarantines and Masks Isn’t in Sight

As the United States moves on from the coronavirus, other countries are still getting left behind.

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox.


The vaccines came, and the tables turned. America’s remarkable speed at vaccinating its populace helped flip its reputation from international coronavirus problem child to reopening poster child.

Countries that once “looked at Europe and the U.S. in horror” are now watching as residents in those same places gear up for a luscious summer, Timothy McLaughin reports from Hong Kong. Meanwhile, dangerous new strains such as Delta remind us that this global pandemic is far from over.


What to read if … you’re considering a Prime Day purchase:

When you subscribe to Amazon Prime, “you’re paying to become part of a system that is purpose-built to keep you paying, forever,” our special-projects editor Ellen Cushing writes.

What to read if … you’re confused and concerned about Turkey’s sea-snot crisis:

See photos of the slime smothering the Sea of Marmara, and read our science reporter Sarah Zhang on why the mucus is a threat to wildlife.

Tonight’s Atlantic-approved activity:

Looking to add something new to your bookshelf? Try Andrea Long Chu’s Females, a book about gender identity “that is nothing like a memoir and not much like a manifesto,” Stephanie Burt wrote for the magazine in 2019.

Find more books that chart new queer narratives in the Books Briefing. (When you buy a book using a link in this newsletter, we receive a commission. Thank you for supporting The Atlantic.)

Today’s break from the news:

In the 1930s, the government paid a group of writers to make a series of American travel guides. The resulting books offer a rich, weird, and frustrating glimpse at that moment in history, Scott Borchert writes.


Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox.