The Atlantic Daily: American Office Life Is Poised for a Comeback

What did last year’s great forced-remote-work experiment teach us about the future of white-collar jobs?

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White-collar employees’ great forced-remote-work experiment is drawing to an end. Bosses are sounding their managerial bugles, warning the privileged work-from-home class that, in the coming months, they may need to pack up their laptop and return to their cubicle.

So, what did last year’s inadvertent workplace stress-test teach us about the future of the American office? And, more to the point, how on earth are we going to dress for our first in-person meeting?


One question, answered: An anonymous reader says their son’s school is full of cheats. Abby Freireich and Brian Platzer respond in our latest “Homeroom” column:

Encouraging your son’s school to uphold academic integrity will not only protect him and benefit the school; it will also serve the best interests of the students who are cheating.

Keep reading. Every Tuesday, Abby and Brian take questions from readers about their kids’ education. Have one? Email them at homeroom@theatlantic.com.

Tonight’s Atlantic-approved activity:

Read a poem: We recommend José Olivarez’s “Ode to Tortillas.”

A break from the news:

Stacey Abrams, best known for her political organizing, talks about her career as a novelist—and discusses what politics and writing have in common


Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox.