The Atlantic Daily: The Future of American Party Politics

Partisan loyalty continues to threaten the process of lawmaking. Our writers reflect on the past and future of party politics in America—and how partisanship affects the American people.

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox.


This month, President Joe Biden signed a historic $1.9 trillion coronavirus-relief package. Now the president’s advisers are expected to recommend up to $3 trillion in new spending to boost the economy.

Taking such legislation to the finish line is no small feat. As the journalist Jonathan Cohn notes: “Passing big pieces of legislation is a lot harder than it looks … It requires seriousness of purpose—a deep belief that you are working toward some kind of better world.”

Today, partisan loyalty continues to threaten the process of lawmaking. Below, our writers reflect on the past and future of party politics in America—and how partisanship affects the American people.


One question, answered:

I lost my sense of smell from COVID-19. Can I do anything to get it back? Sarah Zhang reports:

Many years before the emergence of the novel coronavirus, a German doctor helped develop and standardize smell training for patients who had lost the sense, typically because of head trauma or viral infections. It involves sniffing four essential oils for 20 seconds every day over several months; some proponents of smell training recommend that patients recall memories associated with each scent—remembering lemon pie while smelling lemon oil, for instance.

While supposed “cures” for smell loss, such as eating a charred orange or poking your forehead while getting flicked in the back of the head, have gone viral on TikTok, smell training is the only scientifically proven intervention for this kind of smell loss.

Read on for more about the strange journey of recovering from smell loss.


Today’s Atlantic-approved isolation activity:

Go ahead, buy that T-shirt.

Today’s break from the news:

What to read if you believe in miracles … or even if you don’t: Recent speculations in physics reveal that believers and nonbelievers may have more in common than they think.


Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox.