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Time froze. States stopped being called.

For days, Joe Biden seemed perma-stuck on the precipice of victory. And the sitting president seemed to know it, delivering extraordinary and baseless claims about election fraud. Fox News faced a choice, and it chose Donald Trump—and his followers—over democracy.

Americans scrolled and scrolled and scrolled, but the answers they sought remained out of reach.

These are the dispatches from this strange election purgatory. This newsletter does not reach your inbox with the closure you seek. But perhaps it can help you make sense of this moment.

Claire Gentile / Getty

What to do this weekend

Take a break. When’s the last time you put down the phone? This election is incredibly consequential. But remember: Too much political news can be bad for your well-being.

Read a book. Revisit our list of novels for feeling better. Looking for inspiration for your next big quarantine reading project? Our senior art director Oliver Munday undertook an epic one: Proust.

Or a work of journalism that has nothing to do with American politics. Squirm your way through this tale of real-life flesh-eating worms. Or explore why the “Free Britney” saga feels so familiar.

Watch. We recently covered:

Nothing catch your eye? Try a classic: It’s comfort-movie season.

Listen. Now would be a good time to blast our election-anxiety playlist.

Tour America from your couch. Our “Fifty” project, from photo editor Alan Taylor, highlights extraordinary photography of each U.S. state. This week’s selection is known as the Magnolia State. Can you guess which state that is?

If you must refresh … We built a site for that: dowehaveapresidentyet.com.


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