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THE ATLANTIC

Joe Biden accrued a record-setting number of votes, proving that the Democratic Party’s coalition is the largest in the country. But that alignment could be tricky to maintain, writers on our politics team warn.

  • The party’s truce is over. From our staff writer Elaine Godfrey: “For Democrats, this election was an exercise in setting aside differences in support of a broader goal: ending the reign of Donald Trump.” That’s done, and their civil war is back on.

  • It could pose a problem for 2024. “The results already have Democratic strategists privately asking frank questions about whether any of the next generation of Democratic leaders … can sustain enough of the coalition that elected Biden to the White House without him on the ballot,” Ronald Brownstein writes.

  • Failures on the state level could also haunt the party. “While the coronavirus pandemic did not stop voters from turning out in record numbers across the country, Democrats believe that it did hamper them in down-ballot races,” Russell Berman reports.

  • Black voters helped deliver Biden victory. Now they want action, Adam Harris writes.

Further reading: Speaking of Democrats, in this excerpt from his new memoir, Barack Obama explains why he still believes in America. Check back on Monday for an exclusive interview between the former president and our editor in chief, Jeffrey Goldberg.

JONAS BENDIKSEN / MAGNUM

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