Bryan Snyder / Reuters

What’s Happening: Watch Out for Falling Confederate Symbols

The days of the Confederate flag as both a political emblem and a readily available pop-culture tchotchke may be ending. On Tuesday, one day after South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley called for the flag to be removed from the grounds of the state capitol, a slew of elected officials and retailers echoed her stance. Among those scrapping or reconsidering: Virginia, eBay, Amazon, Walmart, Sears, and flag-makers.

Talking tough in Eastern Europe: On a trip to Estonia, Defense Secretary Ash Carter announced that the United States will deploy heavy-artillery equipment in the country, along with Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and Romania. The move comes as NATO responds to Russia’s continued activity in Ukraine.

South Sudan buckles: High hopes for the world’s youngest country are faltering as hunger, violence, and political instability push the African nation to the brink. With poverty and a civil war crippling the four-year-old country, millions have been internally displaced.


Screenshot

The giant snow cruiser built for the Admiral Byrd Antarctic expedition is rolled out of the Chicago construction yards in October 1939. See more pictures of the cruiser at The Atlantic Photo. (AP)

Quoted


News Quiz​

1. The average completion rate for the University of Pennsylvania’s massive open online courses [MOOC] was just___________.

(See answer or scroll to the bottom.)

2. Non-religious circumcisions are typically done in the hospital around___________hours after the baby’s birth.

(See answer or scroll to the bottom.)

3. On Tuesday, the Senate made surprise progress on the ____________legislation, which would authorize the president to negotiate international trade agreements.

(See answer or scroll to the bottom.)


Verbs

Hostage policy revised, skinny jeans stigmatized, Chipotle cups preserved, Trump soars, Tidal CEO waves, and UN peacekeepers indicted.


ANSWERS: 4 PERCENT, 24-48 HOURS, TRADE PROMOTION AUTHORITY.


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