Reuters

The wedge-tail eagle, the largest bird of prey in Australia, has a wingspan of nine feet and can lift animals that weigh around 10 pounds, which would, seemingly, rule out young boys. But try telling that to the boy who last week visited the Alice Springs Desert Park in Australia with his mother.

The park issued a statement Monday in which it said that a bird “made contact with an audience member.”

Here’s a picture of that “contact”:

Northern Territory News interviewed a man at the show who said the boy had closed the hood of his sweatshirt around his face, which may have confused the eagle. The park canceled the show. The boy was fine, and left without serious injury.

Eagles have tried to carry off children before, though it was much more of a problem 100 years ago. One eagle tried to carry off a Scottish baby, and another a child in Maine. In Milwaukee, an eagle snatched a two-month-old child from its cradle and flew back to its nest. There was even a YouTube video four years ago that showed what looked to be a golden eagle that snatched a child in a grassy Canadian park. But that turned out to be a hoax.

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