Seth Wenig / AP

Sheldon Silver, the former speaker of the New York Assembly, was sentenced Tuesday to 12 years in prison for corruption.

Sheldon, a Democrat, was arrested in January 2015 and reluctantly resigned as speaker of the state Assembly, a position he’d held since 1994. A jury found him guilty last November on seven corruption charges.

The Times Union adds:

In documents submitted last month, prosecutors requested that Silver be sent away for a "greater than any sentence imposed on other New York State legislators convicted of public corruption offenses." The state record public corruption sentence length belongs to former Assemblyman William Boyland Jr., who received 14 years in prison following his 2015 conviction on bribery charges.

Silver's attorneys had sought a sentence below federal guidelines, "possibly coupled with home confinement and community service."

Based on federal guidelines, Silver could face more than 27 years in prison for his conviction on seven counts ranging from honest services fraud to extortion.

Silver, who was first elected to the state Assembly in 1976, was found to have taken $4 million in bribes and kickbacks.

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