On Monday morning, two men reportedly dressed as women attempted to drive through the security gate outside the NSA headquarters at Fort Meade in Maryland in a stolen SUV. One of the men was killed and the other was wounded by police gunfire.

What We Know About the Shooting

"Just after 9 a.m. today, one person was killed and another injured when they attempted to drive a vehicle into the National Security Agency portion of the installation without authorization," read a statement from Fort Meade officials. "NSA security personnel prevented them from gaining access to the installation."

Fort Meade, in addition to hosting the NSA, is Maryland's largest employer with 29,000 civilian workers and 11,000 military personnel stationed there. According to aerial footage of the crime scene, it appears that the car driven by the intruders rammed into a security vehicle near the entrance to the compound.

CBS News reported that "cocaine and a gun were found in the suspects’ car," a detail that has yet to be confirmed elsewhere.

"We Do Not Believe It Is Related to Terrorism"

Amy J. Thoreson, a spokeswoman for the FBI, which is leading the investigation, offered that the situation was "contained" and that "we do not believe it is related to terrorism."

As the Associated Press pointed out, this is the second act of violence on the NSA campus this month. On March 3, another man fired on a building on the NSA's campus while on a shooting spree that involved firing at other cars and buildings.

What We Don't Know About the Shooting

Little is known about the identities and motives of the two men involved in Monday's incident, and officials are revealing few details about the incident itself. A report citing that the two men had been partying at a hotel nearby raises questions about whether they even intended to drive to the NSA at all. As The New York Times noted, an NSA statement "does not mention anyone other than NSA police firing a weapon."

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