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In the latest twist in Adrian Peterson's ongoing child abuse saga, the Vikings organization has decided to place Peterson on the league's "exempt" list.

The designation will keep the All-Pro running back from participating in any team activities while he contends with felony charges of reckless or negligent injury to a child. Players on the exempt list continue to receive their salary.

Peterson surrendered himself to police in Texas on Saturday after he was accused of injuring one of his sons while disciplining him with a switch. He did not play in the Vikings loss to the New England Patriots on Sunday, but was initially cleared to play this Sunday, a decision that was met with considerable pushback.

In a joint statement released on Wednesday, Vikings owner Zygi Wilf and team president Mark Wilf offered an explanation for their decision:

In conversations with the NFL over the last two days, the Vikings advised the League of the team’s decision to revisit the situation regarding Adrian Peterson. In response, the League informed the team of the option to place Adrian on the Exempt/Commissioner’s Permission list, which will require that Adrian remain away from all team activities while allowing him to take care of his personal situation until the legal proceedings are resolved. After giving the situation additional thought, we have decided this is the appropriate course of action for the organization and for Adrian."

They added their support for Peterson and asked fans to "respect the process that we have gone through to reach this final decision."

On Tuesday evening, Peterson lost his endorsement deal with Castrol Motor Oil. According to CNN, the company pulled commercials featuring Peterson from YouTube and removed his image from various products online. On Wednesday, Nike announced it was also pausing its relationship with Peterson.

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