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Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson was indicted for child abuse on Friday, according to reports from MyFox 26 in Houston, Texas. Peterson was charged for "reckless or negligent injury to a child," the network said. According to one report from the NFL Network's Ian Rapoport, the case arose from incident in which Peterson disciplined his son with "a switch."

WCCO-CBS in Minneapolis obtained a police report that includes images of the boy's injuries. He suffered numerous cuts and lacerations. In the police report, Peterson admits that he did "whoop" the child, but considered it to be a normal spanking. A doctor who treated him called it "child abuse."

The news comes amidst a larger controversy surrounding the league treatment of players who are involved in domestic abuse incidents. Baltimore running back Ray Rice was suspended indefinitely this week, after new video surfaced of him assaulting his wife last February.

The eight-year Vikings' veteran is cooperating with investigators, but will have to turn himself into authorities, leaving his status for this Sunday's game against the New England Patriots up in the air, according to Jay Glazer of Fox Sports. (Update, 7:00 p.m.: Peterson has been deactivated by his team and will not play on Sunday.)

Peterson missed his Vikings practice on Thursday, but the team did not release a reason and the perennial Pro-Bowler returned to the practice field on Friday. The Vikings say they are still gathering information about the case.

Meanwhile, Child Protective Services confirmed to TMZ that they are working on a case involving Peterson and have said the alleged victim is an 11-year-old boy.

Another child of Peterson's, a two-year-old son, died on October 11 of last year, after allegedly being abused by Joseph Robert Patterson, who was dating the child's mother at the time. Patterson has been charged with murder and manslaughter, and was later arrested again for kidnapping and assaulting the boy's mother while out on bail.

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