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Outgoing Boston mayor Thomas Menino will help launch an Institute on Cities at Boston University next year after he leaves office. The program is intended to help address urban issues and "might offer boot camps for city officials, act as a clearinghouse where municipalities could compare data, and serve as a think tank for urban problem solving."

In an interview at the university, Menino said that, "in a few years we want to be the leading university when it comes to urban America." The longtime mayor has agreed to a five-year contract beginning in February, about a month after he leaves his post as the city's top official, and does not currently plan to teach courses at the school.

As for other details, though specifics are prevented from being divulged, Menino's compensation will likely be comparable to other professors at the university—around $150,000—and he says that he began avoiding dealings with potential employers while in office last January, shortly before he announced that he would not seek another term.

Menino is also planning to write a book about his time as a politician.

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