This article is from the archive of our partner .

FBI agents searched a field outside of Detroit Monday afternoon in an effort to find the body of former Teamster boss Jimmy Hoffa, missing for nearly 40 years. Seems promising, right, coming off a tip from a former mobster? This is at least the 15th such tip since Hoffa vanished — including seven in and around Detroit. There have been six searches in the last ten years.

We took a quick look at the history of attempts to find Hoffa, mapping them below.

Some highlights (links to stories are on the map):

  • Shortly after Hoffa went missing in 1975, searches focused near Detroit, including a local restaurant (where he was reportedly put into a trash compactor) and a nearby horse farm.
  • The next most-promising region was New Jersey, home to one or two mobsters. There's the Giants Stadium rumor, of course, as well as a late-'70s search of a Jersey City landfill.
  • One report suggested that Hoffa was cut into pieces and dumped in a swamp in the Everglades.
  • Another said that he was put into junk car, compacted, and shipped overseas as scrap metal.
  • One of the most distant reports had Hoffa somehow being taken to Gardena, California, as a hostage.

None of those searches were borne out, of course.

Maybe this time will be different. In January, when the tipster's claims were first introduced, NBC affiliates around the country showed the following image of the field the FBI's investigating.

Looks like as good a place to start digging as any.

In related news, authorities in New York are searching a home in Queens for a missing thug. The home was once owned by one of the mobsters portrayed in Goodfellas, making it more interesting than it might otherwise be. But they'll probably have no luck either. We have it on good authority that the guy they're looking for was buried underneath the grass at Ford Field.

Photo: An FBI team searches a Michigan farm for Hoffa in 2006.

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.