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Do you like computers, love Hawaii, and would thrill at the opportunity to access our government's most highly classified secrets? Then Booz Allen Hamilton has the job for you!

The security and consulting firm posted a job opening last month that sounds suspiciously similar to the one that Edward Snowden used to do for Booz Allen, before he hightailed it out the country and started leaking what he took with him. The position of "Information Security Engineer" is based in Hawaii, requires experience with network engineering and host-based security systems, and — this is non-negotiable, we assume — a full security investigation and background check to determine "eligibility requirements for access to classified information."

Naturally, there are lots of jobs like this at a lot of companies that work (almost exclusively with the government, but since it was posted on May 22, right around the time that Snowden took a leave of absence from the exact same firm, it looks a lot like an attempt to fill the hole he left behind. (The company hasn't commented on the posting, but did release a short non-statement about the leak.) Like Snowden, you you don't even need a college degree! Move fast though. Given all the attention this company and story are getting now, you're probably going to get a lot of competition!

Here's the full posting:

Information Security Engineer, Mid Job

Date: May 22, 2013

Location: Honolulu, HI, US

Description: Information Security Engineer, Mid-01127993

Description

Key Role:

Support a client's information assurance (IA) program manager to provide effective IA development, implementation, operation, maintenance, and modification to meet DoD and DON IA requirements in support of major communication systems. Assist IAM to research, analyze, implement, accredit, manage risk, and maintain detailed IA policies, plans, and programs. Work with the IT system owners to coordinate with command security requirements and provide systems engineering to support the certification and accreditation (C&A) manager. Develop and review documentation and artifacts for Defense Information Assurance Certification and Accreditation Process (DIACAP) packages for the command and subordinate commands. Conduct C&A validation testing, document results, and recommend steps for the remediation and mitigation of vulnerabilities. Coordinate with representatives of the Certifying Authority (CA) and Designated Approving Authority (DAA) to attain Authority to Operate (ATO) for systems and networks. This position is located in Honolulu, HI.

Qualifications

Basic Qualifications:
-4+ years of experience with network engineering or Information Assurance
-3+ years of experience with DIACAP or DITSCAP certification and accreditation within the last 5 years
-Top Secret clearance required
-IAM Level II 8570.01 M Certification (i.e. CAP, GSLC, CISM or CISSP)

Additional Qualifications:
-Experience with Navy IA and C&A processes
-Experience with computer network defense
-Experience with host-based security systems (HBSS)
-BA or BS degree preferred
-Fully Qualified Navy Validator Certification

Clearance:
Applicants selected will be subject to a security investigation and may need to meet eligibility requirements for access to classified information; Top Secret clearance is required.

Integrating the full range of consulting capabilities, Booz Allen is the one firm that helps clients solve their toughest problems, working by their side to help them achieve their missions. Booz Allen is committed to delivering results that endure.

We are proud of our diverse environment, EOE, M/F/D/V.

Job: Information Security Engineering
Primary Location: United States-Hawaii-Honolulu
Travel: Yes, 5 % of the Time

Nearest Major Market: Honolulu 
Nearest Secondary Market: Hawaii 
Job Segment: Information Security, Security, Engineer, Consulting, Database, Technology, Engineering

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