This article is from the archive of our partner .

It was easy to spot the kid being sentenced to three life terms in an Ohio courtroom today. He was the one wearing a white T-shirt on which he'd written "KILLER".

On the morning of February 27 last year, Thomas Lane pulled out a hand gun in the cafeteria of Chardon High School near Cleveland and started shooting. He hit four students in the cafeteria, and then — as he fled the scene chased by the school's football coach — a fifth. Three died. When Lane was arrested near his car, he was wearing a gray shirt with the word "KILLER" written across the chest, as seen in this video still taken during his interrogation that day.

Last month, Lane pled guilty to the murders. At his sentencing, he was clearly unrepentant. The Cleveland Plain Dealer reported on the hearing.

T.J. Lane came to his sentencing this morning for the murder of three Chardon High School students, unbuttoned his blue dress shirt and revealed a white T-shirt with the word "Killer" on it -- the same chilling one-word message he wore in February 2012 when he committed the crimes.

Lane also made a statement to the court and reporters said he then gave the middle finger to the courtroom and swore, according to an video feed from the courtroom.

While family members of his victims made statements to the court, the Plain Dealer says Lane was "smirking and smiling."

Before the shooting, Lane posted a note on Facebook that described violent deaths in a small town, conveying the same blend of anger and immaturity he displayed today in court. Lane, 18, is not eligible for parole, and will spend the rest of his life in prison.

Update, 3:52 p.m.: Video of Lane's court appearance is now online, as spotted by Death and Taxes. A word of warning before you hit play: his comments are intentionally upsetting, vulgar, and offensive.

T-shirt image from Plain Dealer, via pool.

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.