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Behind the New York Times pay wall, you only get 10 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

Top Stories: The story of the rise and fall of Cecilia Chang, the St. John's University dean who committed suicide following a corruption trial — and a woman who had great success but lived a life filled with sordid details, possibly including murder. 

World: A report finds not-so-good news out of Afghanistan — only one Afghan National Army is able to operate independently, and violence is higher than before the American forces surge two years ago. 

U.S.: Michigan's legislature might approve labor union limits, much to the chagrin of protestors and despite the fact that "there would seem no more unlikely a target for this fight than [the state], where labor, hoping to demonstrate strength after a series of setbacks, asked voters last month to enshrine collective bargaining into the state Constitution." 

Technology: A federal report claims that mobile apps for children don't "give parents basic explanations about what kinds of personal information the apps collect from children." 

Science: NASA's older rover, Opportunity, is "exploring a more intriguing plot of Martian real estate," even though its mission was supposed to have ended.

Health: Some cities are reporting small but "significant" drops in childhood obesity rates

Sports: John Forté, a Brooklyn musician, was tasked to create an anthem for the Nets.

Opinion: Frank Bruni on God, politics, and West Point

Dance: Alastair Macaulay raves over Renee Robinson's farewell performance, which proved "she was still a compelling image of style, moving with verve and élan at the heart of two of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater’s classic works." 

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

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