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Eagle-eyed parade fans noticed something strange when the confetti rained down at the annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on Thursday: that some of the confetti was poorly shredded police documents with important information on it. 

WPIX first reported the discovery that some of the confetti came from Nassau County police department documents. Attendees found strips of paper with social security numbers, incident reports, license plate numbers, and even something about Mitt Romney's motorcade from when he visited Long Island on them at the parade. Some of the information on the pieces of paper would normally be confidential. 

The real question is how the confetti got there in the first place. Macy's claims they only use "commercially manufactured, multicolor confetti, not shredded paper," but here we are, with police documents laying in the streets. And a Nassau County police source told the New York Post the confetti would have had to come straight from their headquarters. So the question becomes how and why the police confetti was being used in the first place. 

Tinfoil hat conspiracy theorists can calm down, though. It doesn't seem like some kind of cover-up. Someone trying to cover their own trail wouldn't shred everything so poorly and then dump it on people's heads. That's just asking to get caught. But the police are investigating to try and figure out how the documents got there in the first place. 

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