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We don't yet know how much damage Hurricane Sandy will do. But we already have evidence of the ruinous effects the storm is having on the crowing glory of so many women: their hair. Sifting through photos from the entire East Coast, you can measure Sandy's intensity by the Ponytail Index -- whether women will venture outside hatless or elastic band-less, and what disastrous effects those decisions have. A quick Twitter search pulls up hundreds of tweets echoing the concerns of @Betelly, who tweeted, "This bitch sandy done fucked my hair up." Many sufferers posted photographic evidence. "GUYS IM LAUGHING SO HARD LOOK AT MY HAIR HURRICANE SANDY I C U" tweets @SexGodHoran, who appears to be tweeting from Byfield, Massachusetts and posted the photo above. At left, a woman on the Hoboken, New Jersey waterfront had a ponytail that doubles as a windsock on Monday.

You can track the progress of the storm by hair intensity. In Florida on Friday:

Along the beach on Sunday:

Nine-year-old Molly White struggles to control her hair in Frankford, Delaware on Sunday.

(Photo via Associated Press.)

Inland Hurricane Hair in New York on Monday:

There can be grave consequences for not protecting your hair during a record-breaking storm. Monday morning, tamel4684 tweeted this photo of some escaped hair in a tree on Instagram.

Monday afternoon, @bewedbyEllie tweeted that Sandy blew her hair up really high, but not off, at Carl Schurz Park in Manhattan.

Sandy-related hairface on Instagram:

Hair-tentacles:

Many hair casualties were tweeted as the waters rose on the Eastern Seaboard. "Me, my hair and the wind are living the ultimate struggle right now. Thanks a lot Sandy," @KissMeImMixed_ tweeted. 

In dire times like these, one must sacrifice vanity temporarily for the greater hair good. "This is how I keep my hair dry and away from that hatin ass bitch SANDY!!"

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