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Today in Sports: Remembering the Dream Team, riots at Euro 2012, and another warning for NFL players.

  • More than 180 people were arrested before Tuesday's European Championship match between Russia and Poland in Warsaw and the Russian soccer federation was find $150,000 after fans both in and out of the stadium displayed giant banners saying "This is Russia" and others carried old Soviet flags. The signs were seen as provocation to the locals after decades of Soviet control over the country during the Cold War. Both sides did battle with each other and with riot cops. Russian fans that were arrested may be banned from returning to the country or from going to future international matches. Oh, and the game ended in 1-1 tie. [APDaily Mail]

  • An Indian elephant at the Krakow Zoo in Poland was asked to pick the winners of Euro 2012 games in the hopes of replicating the success of Paul the Octopus, who had a sterling record of grabbing food from the right team's bowl during the 2010 World Cup. The elephant hasn't got a single game right yet. [The Wall Street Journal]

  • As the 20th anniversary of the Barcelona Olympics approaches, NBA TV will air a documentary on the 1992 Dream Team tonight and that's also being complimented by this oral history of the team published in GQ. [GQ]

  • Here's a profile of Aubrey McClendon, the embattled CEO of Chesapeake Energy Corp and a part-owner of the Oklahoma City Thunder, who lives a lavish lifestyle that relies on heavily leveraged debt. [Financial Post]

  • English soccer club Manchester United will abandon its plan to launch an IPO on the Hong Kong stock exchange ... so that it can do another one in the United States. The Premier League team has been estimated at various times to be the most valuable sports franchise in the world and would likely be worth over $1 billion on the public market. [International Financing Review]

  • Following the DUI arrest of Super Bowl winning lineman Dave Diehl, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell sent a memo to all his teams today reminding them to not let their players drive drunk. It's a persistent problem for the league and one that contributes to the image of pro athletes as lawless thugs. (It doesn't help when fellow players defend their teammates after such incidents.) Goodell's memo says that, "Every negative incident undermines the respect we have earned from our fans, erodes the confidence of our business partners and threatens the continued success of the league. As your club concludes its mini-camp, it is essential that you take time to reinforce this message with your staff and players." [CBS Sports]

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