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Mitt Romney had a full day of campaigning in Pennsylvania on Saturday that included a joke, a flub, and some talk about the economy. 

First: the joke. AP photographer Evan Vucci tweeted this photo of a note Mitt Romney left for the travelling pool of reporters following him on the campaign trail:

There's something about the simplicity and bluntness of "P.S. - Erased your hard drives," that we love, but some may not find it that funny.

While speaking in Pennsylvania on Saturday, Romney did make a small flub during his speech Saturday morning. He accidentally referred to Obama as Governor. Politico's Maggie Haberman and Juana Summers report Romney said, "He upon becoming governor ? excuse me, president , last time ? - governor might have been a better job for him to have started with." It's a simple mistake, most likely nothing more than a slip of the tongue. Though Haberman points to Dan Amira's observation earlier this week that the President has switched from referring to Romney as "Governor" to "Mr. Romney" when he speaks. 

 

But the overall message for the Republican hopeful on Saturday was the economy, and how much he wants to talk about it. "I know the president wants to talk about the economy, a little," Romney said, but "not as much as I want to talk about the economy." Romney was speaking in Carbon County at the Weatherly Casting & Machine Company, ABC News reports. 

Romney even reworked the President's 2008 campaign slogan to spell out how much he wants to talk about the economy. "Last time around, as you recall, his campaign slogan was hope and change," he said. "Now I think he’d like to change it to ‘hoping to change the subject.’ He’s not wanting to talk about the economy like I want to talk to the economy, because what I want to do — I want to get America working again. I want to create more good jobs for Americans."

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