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Former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich just entered a federal prison in Colorado after what sounds like a very disappointing lunch at a "50's-style restaurant" outside Denver, during which he couldn't finish his double patty melt with fries. Blagojevich flew from Chicago to Denver on Thursday, stopping to eat at the Freddy's Frozen Custard and Steakburgers in Littleton, Colorado, before checking into the nearby Federal Correctional Institution Englewood. Thursday's the first day of the 14-year sentence he's serving for trying to sell President Barack Obama's Illinois Senate seat after the 2008 election, so it's understandable his mind was not on his food. Plus, the portions there are apparently pretty big

For those not on the way to prison, the patty melt at the Littleton Freddy's gets generally good reviews. Yelper Bob S. says it's his favorite, in spite of his two-star review of Freddy's (thanks to its prices): "A smashed burger slathered with American cheese, a few shreds of grilled onions (at your request), and served on griddled rye bread." Jamie L. described it as "oniony, cheesey goodness of smashed steakburger." The fries -- shoestring style "with just the right amount of some type of delicious seasoning salt," according to Elly W. -- also get favorable reviews, but A G. says "if you eat in the restaurant they give you more than most folks can eat." 

Blagojevich said his final, public goodbye on Wednesday night when he called a press conference to say "I'm leaving with a heavy heart, a clear conscience and I have high, high hopes for the future." But aside from his lack of appetite, he didn't show that heaviness at his final meal as a free man, which he shared with three other people, not including his wife, Patti. "I think it's kind of surreal to him, but he seems in good spirits," Freddy's owner Brian Pyle told the Associated Press. 

[Freddy's burger photo via Nels Lindahl / Flickr]

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