CIA Clearly Doesn't Like Ex-Agents Talking to Journalists

The CIA announced the arrest of John Kiriakou, a former agent, for leaking classified information, marking the second time this month the agency is sending the message that it doesn't like its ex-agents to be talking to reporters.

This article is from the archive of our partner .

The CIA announced the arrest of John Kiriakou, a former agent, for leaking classified information, marking the second time this month the agency is sending the message that it doesn't like its ex-agents to be talking to reporters. The AP's report on the arrest doesn't say which news organization(s) Kiriakou, an ex-CIA agent living in Arlington, Va., provided classified information to related to the interrogation of al-Qaeda member Abu Zubaydah, which involved waterboarding, according to what Kiriakou told ABC in a year ago. "Prosecutors launched the investigation after defense lawyers filed a classified legal brief in 2009 that included details that had never been provided by the government. Authorities concluded that Kiriakou had leaked the information to reporters, and that reporters had provided the information to the defense," the AP reports.

But the leaks do involve the identities of two CIA officiers, one of whom interrogated Zubaydah, according to the Justice Department's statement on the arrests. And the Justice Department also mentions this front-page story in The New York Times detailing the CIA's interrogation of Zubaydah (without directly linking Kiriakou's disclosures to it). Kiriakou, we know though, is someone who likes to have himself heard, publishing a memoir about his spying days and contributing to The Huffington Post. Today's arrest comes on the heels of one three weeks ago of another not-so-tight-lipped ex-agent, Jeffrey Sterling, who allegedly gave classified information about the CIA's work in Iran to The New York Times.

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.