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Now that The New York Times pay wall is live, you only get 20 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

Top Stories: Great Britain finds itself in an awkward position, safely outside the instability of the euro crisis, but unable to wield any influence over its outcome. While some may gloat over the decision to keep the pound, Europe's collapse would hurt them as well. The murder rate in New Orleans is so high, the mayor says “a student attending John McDonogh [High School] was more likely to be killed than a soldier in Afghanistan.”

World: The crash of that drone plane in Iran shows how deep the CIA's efforts go to spy on the country. 

Politics: How New York Governor Andrew Cuomo quickly pushed through an overhaul of the state tax code, by keeping negotiations secret and the public off the trail. Some call it leadership, others a dictatorship.

Business: New York socialites are making their own money by starting companies in the fashion and beauty business.

Health: A new study suggests that soccer players who repeatedly head the ball are seeing significant effects on the brain, despite never suffering a concussion.

Technology: Two musician brothers have designed a iPhone app that provides a "soundtrack" for Central Park, where various musical pieces shift and overlap according to where the listening is walking in the park. Gyms are losing the war in the fight against cell phones in the workout room.

Books: Extra Virginity, based on a 2007 article in The New Yorker, exposes the outright lies that infect the olive oil business (such as dubious claims about the origin and purity of oils) and teaches readers how to tell frauds from the good stuff.

Homes: A two-story home in Scotland that is so energy efficient it doesn't need a heater or an air-conditioner.

Obituaries: M*A*S*H* star Harry Morgan passed at 96. Marion Dougherty, a Hollywood casting director, who gave some of the world's biggest stars their first roles.

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